With the already sometime ago release of her first  book Bajo las alfrombras del congreso, a vivid scan of dayly life in the Spanish Congress, Ketty Garat, was a young, dynamic exponent of what free journalism means nowadays. Bajo las alfrombras del congreso is the starting point for her new crusade: a seamless, unbiased, neat journalism, based on what she really perceives, far away from those restrictions directly imposed by ideological, political and economical powers. Ketty Garat easily conforms the Planet-BPM profile as a young, internationally driven professional, who defends adventure. Like Charles Dickens at the beginning of his career, for four years now, Ketty Garat has worked as a parliamentary journalist, reporting on both the Congress debates and election campaigns…

P-B: So, Ketty, what is it that makes a young Congress reporter one day sit down and write about the downside of politicians?

KG: Let’s say it is basically the huge amount of details overlooked when communicating about our politicians, on the grounds of both personal and professional profiles.

P-B: According to the book, there is an enormous gap between what normal people usually think of “the threes” – Zapatero, de la Vega and Rublacaba- and what they really are like…

KG: Well, I’d rather start with Rubalcaba: whereas everybody thinks of him as deeply Machiavellian, the “serial political killer” who enjoys head-chopping, the truth is that making his mind up can take him ages…

P-B: sounds Hamletian, very Hamletian…

KG: Quite, because he hesitates all the time, overwhelmed with his own doubts and insecurity, great insecurity. He would only read El País, Público,La Vanguardia and El Periódico de Cataluña, simply because he cannot deal with negative criticism.

madrid improved!And what he and Mariano Rajoy have in common is this spooky, Houdini-like skill to escape. The most important thing for Alfredo Pérez Rubalcaba is his love for the party;  he is loyal, very loyal to his people and so faithful that eventually he can turn naïve. That is why he was stabbed by Zapatero and then, of course he stabbed him back, but at the end of the day it is this sense of loyalty what deeply distinguishes him from de la Vega, for instance. Alfredo’s main concern has always been conveying this feeling of harmony and perfect coordination from within the party, which de la Vega didn’t. To begin with, she did not hold the Party ID. She came, like many others from the outside world – the courts, in her particular case. The predatory type is definitely Zapatero, no qualms. He can be in perfect terms – actually in love – with Jordi Sevilla, for instance, and half a second later, make his head roll down.

P-B: so everything is in the book, I mean, in detail?

KT:  Absolutely. Actually the book takes up the legislature’s structure, comprising two parts: the first one focusing on the Congress of Deputies, and the second one covering the collapse of the Spanish Socialist party. Whereas in the first part of any government you can witness Congress debates, Control Commissioning, and a great deal of Bono, the second one deals with a mysterious Mr. X – ZP, in this verycase – supporting candidate Chacón from within the darkness, and the final victory of Rubalcaba when Felipe’s  and Guerra’s followers merged to beat Zapatero’s option (i.e. Carme Chacón) down.

P-B: so how about José Bono?

KT: Oh, the “Prima Bonna”, you mean, well nobody likes the catwalk like him; it’s not just parading in the limelight, but rather modelling. He can actually tell by the nose if cameras and news are around, so as to slowly taste the questions and lick the answers. There are loads of stories about him.

P-B: and Soraya Sáenz de Santamaría?

KT: A hard worker and methodical, very methodical…she used to lock herself-up every Wednesday to careful prepare her arguments before getting into the ring to be face-to-face with Rublacaba…

P-B: The Spanish Electoral Laws seems quite faulty, at first sight, doesn’t it?

KT: well, just compare it with the French Law for example, and its mandatory double scrutiny; it only makes it more solid, and fair…

P-B: The profile of the Spanish politicians is…

KT: Low, definitely low…because of the remarkable  nepotism that characterises our political system, anyone can become a politician inSpain, just look at the Jose Blanco case, we all know he did never graduate…

P-B: And places such as l’ENA – École Nationale d’Administration- in France, simply do not exist in Spain….

KT: Of course not. What happened in Blanco’s case, was that he helped ZP a lot during the “Knifes Night”….and ZP never forgot it, supporting his career all along during the legislature.  On the other hand legal figures such as Parliamentary Immunity,  opens a door up for corruption and/or money dilapidation…it is our political system itself what makes it all possible; in Spain a politician is powerful, just because of the system, whereas in other countries – the UK , for example – requested to explain what they have done one day and why during their tenure and in the course of their duties.

P-B: And to finish with, what is the solution to such chaos?

KT: Unlike what the 15M followers seem to defend, I do not think the solution is the system’s demolition, on the contrary, this book shows my determination to defend the system from a very critical point of view. All parliaments have rugs, and all rugs have trash beneath; let’s lift them, have them cleaned up.  At the end of the day, this book intends to bring up valuable things that, like the trash, are equally hiding under the rugs.